$1,000 Cash Reward for OMHOF Stolen Guitars

$1,000 Cash Reward for OMHOF Stolen Guitars

As you may have read, 72 autographed guitars were stolen from the storage unit of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame in Portland. Recent reports of recovered guitars in the Portland area note that those recoveries do not include any of the OMHOF guitars. These guitars were autographed for auction to raise money for music education and scholarship programs. They include guitars signed by The MonkeesGeorge ClintonLucinda WilliamsArlo Guthrie and Portugal. The Man; as well as guitars signed by each OMHOF annual group of inductees. We are now offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the recovery of these instruments. We need help from all of you to recover and restore these precious instruments like the handcrafted “State of Oregon” guitar shown below. They may currently be for sale online or through a variety of outlets like music stores and pawn shops.

If you have any information on this burglary please notify scholarship director Janeen Rundle (info@omhof.org), the Portland police (503.823.3333) or (crimetips@portlandoregon.gov) or Crime Stoppers (http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com).

Your attention will be much appreciated.

Oregon Music Hall of Fame has 70 guitars swiped from NE Portland storage unit

Oregon Music Hall of Fame has 70 guitars swiped from NE Portland storage unit

By Drew Marine

PORTLAND, Ore. (KPTV) – Terry Currier wears many hats. He’s the owner of Music Millennium and the president of the Oregon Music Hall of Fame, to name a few.

Since they started inducting musicians and industry professionals in the late 2000s, he’s been collecting signed guitars.

“At that time, we were auctioning off about 15 guitars per year,” Currier said. “I needed to get at least 15 guitars, but I always wanted to have a reserve. Those guitars I would go get signed by artists when they came through town.”

Each year they auction off these guitars to give four college-bound students a scholarship for music education and bring music to schools that don’t offer those programs.

Their biggest fundraiser is their induction ceremony, which is slated for Oct. 8 at the Aladdin Theater.

“The scholarship program has probably been our most rewarding program,” Currier said. “Being a board member (and) going through the applications each year.”

But over a week ago, all 70 guitars he had collected were taken from their storage unit in northeast Portland. Those missing range from Fender Stratocasters and Fender Squiers to Gibsons. They had signatures including from The Monkees, Lucinda Williams, Dave Mason and actor Tim Robbins.

“I had a gut ache,” he said. “It’ll probably cost $30,000-$40,000 to replace those guitars.”

The loss is more than just the dollar amount.

“Those are irreplaceable,” Currier said. “I can get another ‘Portugal. The Man’ guitar. I can get other artists to sign guitars, but a lot of the inductees are no longer with us anymore so there’s no way to retrieve those signatures.”

If you know where these guitars are, or if you spot any, Currier said you’re in for a hefty reward.

“We’re going to give somebody one of the guitars we retrieve,” he said. “And we’ll give them tickets to our induction ceremony in October.”

Copyright 2022 KPTV-KPDX. All rights reserved.

OMHOF’s new Women in Music Graduate School Scholarship

Women in Music Graduate School Scholarship: In Memory of Gloria Johnson by Bill Johnson

Qualifications:

-Must have received Bachelor’s degree from an Oregon College or University in Spring 2022 and be accepted to a Master’s Program in Fall of 2022 in the USA

-Area of Study: Broadcasting (Radio/Web), Music Performance, Music Therapy, Music Technology, Music Education, Music Business, Music Theory, Music Composition, Music Production

DEADLINE: May 25, 2022 for the Gloria Johnson Graduate Scholarship (college scholarship deadline is still March 15, 2022)

OMHOF 2022 scholarship available now. Application deadline March 15, 2022

The 2022 OMHOF scholarship application is available now at https://www.omhof.org/music-education-scholarships/

Application deadline is March 15, 2022.

OMHOF 2021 Induction Ceremony October 9th at Aladdin Theater

Oregon Music Hall of Fame 2021 Induction Ceremony

Aladdin Theater

October 9, 2021 7:00 PM +Google+iCal
Doors Open: 6:00 PM

VIEW SEATING CHARTMORE INFORMATION

*Proof of COVID vaccination or negative COVID test required for entry. FREE onsite testing available – Details here*

OREGON MUSIC HALL OF FAME2021 INDUCTION CEREMONYFeaturing Live Performances byTodd SniderLifesavasRenato Caranto with Louis Pain Trio

The Oregon Music Hall of Fame (OMHOF) is proud to announce our 2021 Induction Ceremony on Saturday, October 9th at the Aladdin Theater.

 This year’s diverse list of inductees include:

Tommy Thayer, LaRhonda Steele, Todd Snider, Renato Caranto, Lifesavas and The Decemberists. The Dandy Warhols have been voted Artist of the Year and the Koonce-Ross-Fraser album, New American Blues will be honored as Album of the Year.  Gloria Johnson (KGON) and Steve Pringle (KINK) will receive awards in the music industry category. Heritage awards will go to big band leader, Carl Smith and Blues vocalist “Sweet Baby” James Benton.  Portland supper club owner and entertainer, Tony Starlight will host the show.
 

Title Sponsor for this event will be Elliott Powell Baden & Baker, presenting sponsor for the 14th year.

OMHOF was formed in 2003 to both promote and preserve the musical arts in the state of Oregon.  OMHOF began the statewide scholarship program in 2007 and is active in raising funds and implementing music education in schools that do not have music programs. Over 5000 kids per year are reached in K-8 schools throughout the state with the Music In The Schools Program with Aaron Meyer. OMHOF also has a statewide scholarship program in place since 2007. 

Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door.

ALL SALES ARE FINAL. PLEASE, DOUBLE CHECK YOUR ORDER BEFORE PURCHASING. NO REFUNDS.

2021 OMHOF College Scholarship Recipients

2021 OMHOF College Scholarship Recipients:

Kathleen Taylor:  Voice (Classical & Opera)
Century High School-Hillsboro, OR
College Major:  Vocal Performance

Ashley Yoon:  Violin
Lakeridge High School-Lake Oswego, OR
College Major:  Violin Performance

Grace Stearns: Oboe & Voice-Soprano 
St. Helens High School- St. Helens, OR
College Major:  Music Education

Thomas Green:  Double Bass
South Medford High School-Medford, OR
College Major:  Double Bass Performance

Oregon Music Hall Of Fame College Scholarships Applications

Applications are being accepted for the Oregon Music Hall of Fame Scholarship Program.  Four graduating music students will win $2500 to attend college in Fall 2021.
 Last year’s winners include: Taylor Youn, Cello from Lakeridge HS in Lake Oswego; Nicholas Weathers, Clarinet from McNary HS in Keizer, Avery Hsieh, Violin from Corvallis HS in Corvallis,)and Isabella Morill, Piano/French Horn/Composition from Warrenton HS in Warrenton.   The deadline to apply is May 15th.   Applications can be found here.   

2021 scholarship application deadline is May 15, 2021

The 2021 scholarship application deadline is May 15, 2021!  Go to https://www.omhof.org/music-education-scholarships/ to download the application!

2020 OMHOF College Scholarship Deadline: May 22, 2020 (or as soon as you can)!

The 2020 OMHOF college scholarship deadline is May 22, 2020 (or as soon as you can).  Get the scholarship application at: https://www.omhof.org/music-education-scholarships/

Life lessons lead ‘Little Sue’ to Oregon Music Hall of Fame

After seven albums and countless collaborations, singer, songwriter and teacher Susannah Weaver will be inducted into class of 2019 on Oct. 12


If You Go

What: Oregon Music Hall of Fame induction ceremony

When: 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12

Where: Aladdin Theater, 3017 S.E. Milwaukie Ave., Portland

Visit: aladdin-theater.com/event/1876513-oregon-music-hall-fame-13th-portland>www.aladdin-theater.com/event/1876513-oregon-music-hall-fame-13th-portland

Inductees: Artists 3 Leg Torso, Dick Berk, Little Sue, Mark Lindsay, Michael Allen Harrison and Michael Hurley, along with side players Joanna Bolme, John Mazzocco, Don MacLeod, Gary Houston, Larry Crane and Paul Knauls; The Decemberists’ “I’ll Be Your Girl” is Album of the Year and Ural Thomas & The Pain is Artist of the Year.

PMG PHOTO: SHANNON O. WELLS - Susannah Weaver, who performs as Little Sue, still plays regularly at the Laurelthirst Public House at Northeast Glisan Street and 30th Avenue, where she started out with The Crackpots.

PMG PHOTO: SHANNON O. WELLS – Susannah Weaver, who performs as Little Sue, still plays regularly at the Laurelthirst Public House at Northeast Glisan Street and 30th Avenue, where she started out with The Crackpots.

When Susannah Weaver heard she would be inducted in the Oregon Music Hall of Fame’s class of 2019, she reacted with emotion and a touch of ambivalence.”I wept,” she said. “My first question was, ‘Are there other women being inducted this year?’ I didn’t want to be the only woman.”

She also struggled knowing she would be inducted alongside Michael Hurley, one of the long-established Northwest songwriters who captured her imagination soon after her 1992 arrival in Portland.

“I knew I’d been on the (Hall of Fame) list for a couple of years,” said Weaver, who records and performs as Little Sue. “But it’s very bizarre being inducted the same year as Michael Hurley. I don’t know if I ever would’ve written songs at all if it hadn’t been for Hurley.”

All that aside, the recognition feels pretty good for Weaver, a guitarist and singer who — since moving from Michigan to Oregon — has recorded seven solo albums, collaborated regularly with dozens of area musicians, and performed as opening act for luminaries like Roger McGuinn, Loudon Wainwright III and Bob Dylan.

“I’m very proud to be in the Oregon Music Hall of Fame,” she said. “I do feel like I deserve it, I guess. Again, so do lots of people.”

PMG PHOTO: SHANNON O. WELLS - Little Sue has been a regular performer at the Laurelthirst Public House at Northeast Glisan Street and 30th Avenue since the early 1990s.

PMG PHOTO: SHANNON O. WELLS – Little Sue has been a regular performer at the Laurelthirst Public House at Northeast Glisan Street and 30th Avenue since the early 1990s.

Breakups and breakthroughsWeaver, whose seventh album of original songs, “Gold,” came out earlier this year, will be inducted into the hall’s class of 2019 at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Aladdin Theater.

Since the release of her debut CD, “Chimneys & Fishes,” in 1997, the Sauvie Island resident has created an endearingly personal and quirkily poetic body of work, including acclaimed country-folkish albums like “Shine,” “Crow” and 2008’s “Baby Knows Better,” featuring songs inspired by the birth of her son, Vaden.

Weaver wraps her fetching, slightly twangy voice — alternately heart-rending and sassy — around colorfully lyrical tales plucked straight from her own life: marriage, motherhood, sketches of unforgettable Portland characters — and plenty involving, as she says, “failed relationships.”

Weaver, 48, credits her knack for heartbreak songs to her intense relationship with the late singer/songwriter Jim Boyer, a mainstay of the fertile Americana music scene based at Laurelthirst Public House in Northeast Portland.

“Before I’d written anything, (Boyer) was sitting out here breaking up with me,” she recalled, gesturing toward the sidewalk tables just outside the pub’s door. “Ah, Lily (a nickname), your heart’s broken, go write some songs. And I did. More likely, he just said that to get me out of his hair.”

Boyer met Weaver soon after she moved west with The Crackpots, the zany, wildly eclectic ensemble she formed with college friends in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Weaver’s role in the band was limited to harmonies and occasional lead vocals.

It also was Boyer who introduced the fledgling singer to other eclectic, country-tinged songwriters.

A turning point came with Boyer “giving me a tape with the Beastie Boys ‘Check Your Head’ on one side and (Michael Hurley’s) “The Long Journey” on the other,” she recalls. “I’d never heard Hurley before. … It was like a key. I was like, ‘Oh, I thought I had to write like Neil Young.’ I’d been in The Crackpots for six years and never written a song. I thought, ‘Oh, you can be funny and still be poignant.'”

COURTESY PHOTO: MICHAEL ROMANOS - Susannah Weaver, aka Little Sue, is pleased but somewhat perplexed to be inducted into the Oregon Music Hall of Fame in the same class as musical heroes like Michael Hurley.

COURTESY PHOTO: MICHAEL ROMANOS – Susannah Weaver, aka Little Sue, is pleased but somewhat perplexed to be inducted into the Oregon Music Hall of Fame in the same class as musical heroes like Michael Hurley.

Town and countryWeaver enjoys the irony that Portland, not Charleston, West Virginia, where she lived from fifth grade through high school, introduced her to the twang and heartache poetry of country music.

“Some people are like, ‘Oh, it’s Little Sue from West Virginia,’ but I didn’t hear country music there at all,” she said. “I listened to Zeppelin, the Beatles, Rolling Stones. I didn’t listen to country music until I moved to Portland. That was Jimmy (Boyer) and (artists like) Gram Parsons.”

Her longtime friend Paul Brainard, a Portland multi-instrumentalist inducted in the Oregon Music Hall of Fame in 2016, says Weaver’s songs tugged at his heartstrings from the get-go.

“Her songwriting is really unique and special,” he said. “She writes, you would call it folk sometimes, rock sometimes. She has a unique way of structuring songs and chord changes. It’s unusual.

“One of my favorite things about her music is she really has a fresh way of putting things together,” he adds. “On her first album, I thought, ‘Who writes songs like this right out of the gate?'”

After years of working mostly as a full-time musician, Weaver now is content balancing a less demanding performance schedule with a career as a substitute elementary school teacher in Portland and raising her now-teenage son.

“I can do both, but letting go of my identity as Little Sue was really good,” she says of teaching. “It’s made me happier about it: I’m a teacher and I write songs.”

In other words, for Weaver, the Oregon Music Hall of Fame is more than enough fame.

“I don’t want to be a rock star,” she says. “I love seeing new Portland artists really shining. But I’m a working musician. It’s one of my jobs, and I try to do it the best I can.”

COURTESY PHOTO: MICHAEL ROMANOS - Rather than being a touring 'rock star,' Susannah Weaver much prefers writing songs and performing when she feels like it while enjoying domesticity at her Sauvie Island home.

COURTESY PHOTO: MICHAEL ROMANOS – Rather than being a touring ‘rock star,’ Susannah Weaver much prefers writing songs and performing when she feels like it while enjoying domesticity at her Sauvie Island home.